Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
BOOKMARKS | spring 2008

Bookmarks: Great Reads for Spring 2008
Create and share your own reviews at goodreads.com

Shakespeare’s Wife
By Germaine Greer
(HarperCollins)
Feminist provocateur Greer challenges history's tendency to hate the wives of prominent men. Delving into Elizabethan culture and literature, she paints a complex portrait of Shakespeare's wife, Ann Hathaway, suggesting that the Bard's willing his widow his "second-best bed" may not have been the insult it seems.

Unaccustomed Earth
By Jhumpa Lahiri
(Alfred A. Knopf)
Like a singer who doesn't clutter the melody with superfluous melismas, Lahiri tells straightforward narratives rooted in her experience as a Bengali American. These eight pitch-perfect, not-so-short stories of various familial relationships are both universal and revealing of modern Indian mores.

Standing Up to the Madness: Ordinary Heroes in Extraordinary Times
By Amy Goodman and David Goodman
(Hyperion)
"Democracy Now!" radio host Amy Goodman and her investigative-journalist brother celebrate ordinary people fighting for democracy in post-9/11 America: librarians resisting the PATRIOT Act, students rebelling against the censorship of their play on Iraq and psychologists pushing for a ban on torture.

I See Black People: The Rise and Fall of African American-Owned Television and Radio
By Kristal Brent Zook
(Nation Books)
Appalled that minorities, though a third of the national population, own only 3 percent of TV and radio stations, Zook interviewed the handful of black media owners to find out how the marginalized can take back the airwaves.

A Crime So Monstrous: Face-to-Face with Modern-Day Slavery
By E. Benjamin Skinner
(Free Press)
Journalist Skinner talked his way into slave markets on five continents to meet some of the estimated 27 million people worldwide forced to work for no pay. He also takes us inside the nascent U.S. abolitionist movement, an uneasy alliance of evangelical Christians and progressives.

It’s a Jungle Out There: The Feminist Survival Guide to Politically Inhospitable Environments By Amanda Marcotte
(Seal Press)
For any feminist ever at a loss for words, Marcotte offers no-nonsense advice on handling sexism with aplomb and deadly humor, from confronting the pay gap to defusing conservative relatives.

The Ten-Year Nap
By Meg Wolitzer
(Riverhead Books)
Four New York City professionals try to redefine their lives after 10 years of "opting out" of the workforce in favor of full-time motherhood. Wolitzer's novel deftly explores gender roles and stereotypes, turning a compassionate lens on the choices women make and the costs that must be paid.

Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town
By Kelly McMasters
(PublicAffairs)
McMasters recalls both the delights of her Long Island childhood and the unrelenting toll of cancer and other diseases on local families. In novelistic fashion, the author reveals the probable, unforgivable cause: Shirley was situated next door to a nuclear reactor.

The Bishop’s Daughter: A Memoir
By Honor Moore
(W.W. Norton & Company)
Acclaimed poet Moore chronicles her father's double life as an esteemed Episcopal bishop and closeted bisexual, in what is ultimately the story of father and daughter coming to understand each other.

The Women’s Warrior Society
By Lois Beardslee
(University of Arizona Press)
The Native American women in these lyrical vignettes have molded themselves into fierce "she-wolves" as they stare down daily racism.

The Writing Circle
By Rozena Maart
(TSAR Publications)
Using rotating perspectives, Maart shows how the women in a South African writing group react when one of them is raped. As they help her cope, they're forced past boundaries of friendship to confront apartheid and class.

The Year She Disappeared
By Ann Harleman
(University of Texas Press)
Novelist Harleman crafts a remarkable story of a woman who takes her 4-year-old granddaughter cross-country into a life of hiding from a possibly sexually abusive father.

Maya Angelou: A Glorious Celebration
By Marcia Ann Gillespie, Rosa Johnson Butler and Richard A. Long;
foreword by Oprah Winfrey
(Doubleday)
Honoring the 80th birthday of the "people's poet," her friends and family -- including former Ms. editor in chief Gillespie -- offer a biographical homage to this much-revered woman.