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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

January-09-04

Malaysia: Women's Work Clothing Restricted

The Islamic government in Malaysia's city of Kuala Terengganu has banned non-Muslim women from wearing mini-skirts, tight fitting dresses, and even moderately revealing clothes such as short-sleeved shirts and tight jeans to work. Muslim women are being called to wear a headscarf known as the tudong, which has to be tightly drawn about the face.

According to Reuters, this new law is part of governments efforts to drive out what they call "indecency." It is unknown when the planned ban will go into effect, reports Reuters.

Non-Muslim Malaysians make up nearly half of the population of Malaysia. The Parti Islam se-Malaysia (PAS) is the main opposition party in Malaysia. They have plans to make Malaysia an orthodox Islamic state, including having sharia (Islamic) law, reports Reuters. Elections will be held this year.

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Media Resources: BBC News 1/05/04; Reuters 1/5/04


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