Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

October-22-03

US Draft Resolution on Women's Political Participation Needs Work

Women's rights advocates are calling for concrete measures to increase women's political participation in a US draft resolution that will be considered by the United Nations this month. The resolution is intended to highlight the need for more women in political office, but "for real change to occur, we have to move beyond rhetoric to reality," according to June Zeitlin, executive director of the Women's Environment and Development Organization (WEDO).

WEDO proposes including in the resolution concrete, time-bound numerical goals of increasing women's political participation. The group supports proportional representation, in which political parties are awarded legislative seats according to their percentage of the total vote. WEDO points out that the 14 countries with the most women in parliamentary seats use some kind of proportional representation or quota system, as opposed to the US, which ranks 60th globally in the number of women participating in the federal government.

After pressure from women's rights groups, the Bush Administration has included a reference to CEDAW, the international women's treaty, in the draft resolution. The US is the only industrialized nation that has not signed the treaty. "Here is a golden opportunity," said Zeitlin. "With a snap of his fingers, President Bush could muster 67 votes in the Republican-controlled Senate to ratify CEDAW immediately. This would put some instant reality behind his rhetoric in support of women's rights and some credibility behind US pressure on other countries to provide these rights."

Along with WEDO, the Center for Women's Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE), and the Communications Consortium Media Center (CCMC), the Feminist Majority released a scorecard grading the Bush Administration on its rhetoric on global women's issues compared to the reality. Bush received an "Incomplete" on CEDAW. "The Bush Administration's often-voiced commitment to women's rights in Afghanistan and globally is undermined by their continued refusal to support CEDAW ratification," said Eleanor Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority.

LEARN MORE Find out how the Bush Administration was graded by the Global Women's Scorecard

DONATE to the Feminist Majority Foundation and support our global women's rights programs

Media Resources: WEDO release 10/20/03; Feminist Majority


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

10/21/2014 Afghanistan's New First Lady Advances Women's Issues - Just a few days after moving to the presidential palace, Afghanistan's new First Lady Rula Ghani said that she hopes to encourage greater respect for women. Rula Ghani already broke tradition by participating in her husband, Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai's, campaign for President. . . .
 
10/21/2014 Hulu Silences Rape Survivor Speaking Out Against Anti-Abortion Amendment 67 in Colorado - Hulu, an online, ad-supported streaming service, has refused to run an advertisement from the "No on 67" campaign in Colorado, citing the company's policy regarding "controversial" political positions on issues like abortion. In a letter to the CEO of Hulu, dated October 10, the Vote No on 67 Campaign, which is supported by the Feminist Majority Foundation, asked the company to reconsider its unwillingness to air a 35-second spot featuring a rape survivor's testimony about the far-reaching impact of Colorado's proposed Amendment 67. . . .
 
10/21/2014 Obama Administration Issues New Rule to Strengthen Response to Campus Sexual Violence - The Obama Administration announced a new rule last week to more effectively address sexual violence on college campuses by increasing transparency around campus disciplinary proceedings involving sexual violence and establishing rights for survivors within those proceedings. The new rule, announced by the Department of Education, implements changes to the Clery Act, which requires all colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid in the United States to publicly report crime information. . . .