Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

December-20-02

Supreme Court Asks for Bush Opinion in Anti-Abortion Violence Case

In a somewhat unusual move, the US Supreme Court asked the Bush administration’s Solicitor-General for his opinion on a case involving anti-abortion extremists who circulated “WANTED” posters for abortion providers and launched a Web site called the “Nuremberg Files” that lists abortion providers’ personal information and declares them guilty of crimes against humanity. Doctors who were murdered had lines through them crossing them off, and three doctors listed on the posters were killed in the 1990s.

The administration’s opinion could determine whether or not the Supreme Court agrees to hear an appeal from the extremists who claim their actions are protected under free speech provisions in the Constitution, according to Bloomberg News Service.
The case, American Coalition of Life Activists vs. Planned Parenthood, was appealed to the Supreme Court after the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the extremists were liable for threats under the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE) and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) and awarded plaintiffs a $110 million judgment. “Violence is not a protected value. Nor is a true threat of violence with intent to intimidate,” the court ruled in May according to Kaiser Daily Reproductive Health Report.

It will most likely take Solicitor General Theodore Olson, the Bush administration’s Supreme Court lawyer, several months to respond to the justices’ request – which means the case will remain inactive on the court’s docket for the remainder of the court’s term, according to the Boston Globe.

The National Clinic Access Project of the Feminist Majority Foundation led a group of 13 reproductive rights organizations that filed an amicus brief in the case. “These posters and the website are threats, which are not protected by the First Amendment,” FMF President Eleanor Smeal stated. We hope that anti-abortion extremists will learn that the violence and fear they preach will not be tolerated.”

Media Resources: Kaiser Daily Reproductive Health Report 12/17/02; Associated Press 12/16/02; Bloomberg News 12/16/02; Feminist Daily News Wire


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

10/30/2014 Medication Abortion Access Threatened by Oklahoma Court Ruling - An Oklahoma state district court judge has refused to block a state law restricting medication abortion, clearing the way for the law to go into affect on November 1. The Oklahoma Coalition for Reproductive Justice, together with a local abortion clinic in Tulsa, challenged HB 2684 in September, arguing that the law was an unconstitutional restriction on non-surgical abortion in the earliest weeks of pregnancy. . . .
 
10/30/2014 UPS Switches Pregnant Worker Policy Ahead of Supreme Court Case - The United Parcel Service (UPS) is changing its policy on light duty assignments for pregnant workers, even though the company will stand by its refusal to extend accommodations to a former employee in an upcoming Supreme Court case. UPS announced on Monday in a memo to employees, and in a brief filed with the US Supreme Court, that the company will begin offering temporary, light-duty positions to pregnant workers on January 1, 2015. . . .
 
10/29/2014 North Dakota Supreme Court Upholds Abortion Restrictions - The North Dakota Supreme Court yesterday upheld a set of misguided restrictions on medication abortion, allowing what is effectively a ban on early, non-surgical abortions in the state to go into effect immediately. The decision overturned a lower court order finding the law, known as HB 1297, unconstitutional and permanently blocking its enforcement. . . .