Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

November-12-02

Interviews Reveal Position on Women at Augusta National Unchanged

In a media blitz, including a commentary and interviews with key newspapers, Augusta National chair Hootie Johnson staunchly defended and reasserted his position refusing to admit women into the club’s elite membership.

Despite statements made by prominent club members, including Kenneth I. Chenault, chairman and chief executive of American Express; Citigroup chair Sanford Weill; and Lloyd Ward, head of the U.S. Olympic Committee and former president of Ford Motor Company, expressing their support for including women, Johnson insists there is no timeframe for altering the membership policy founded on the premise of “friends, getting together and playing golf, and just … being men,” reported CNNSI.com.

In his commentary appearing in today’s Wall Street Journal, Johnson charged that criticisms of sexism are “ludicrous,” since “women regularly play the course, with no restrictions”—except for their denied membership. (In addition, coed golf foursomes are prohibited.) When questioned by CNNSI about the club’s 1990 policy change admitting African-Americans into membership, Johnson stated that doing so was “the right thing to do.” Still, “[t]hey’re totally different, racial issues and gender issues,” he told the New York Times.

Last month, Martha Burk, chair of the National Council of Women’s Organizations (NCWO), urged commissioner Tim Finchem to “dissociate” the PGA Tour from the Masters because of Augusta National’s continued refusal to admit women into its membership. Finchem had earlier backed away from pressuring Augusta National, claiming that not being a co-sponsor of the Masters, the Tour could not force the club to adopt “host club policy.” However, Burk insists that by sanctioning an event that is held at a club that practices such blatant discrimination, the PGA is violating its own anti-discrimination policies.

The Feminist Majority is a member of NCWO, along with 160 other groups—making total membership close to seven million.

Media Resources: CNNSI.com 11/12/02; Wall Street Journal 11/12/02; NY Times 11/12/02


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

10/23/2014 All of Tennessee's Major Newspapers Have Urged Voters to Reject Anti-Abortion Amendment 1 - All four of Tennessee's major papers have spoken out to oppose Amendment 1, a dangerous anti-abortion measure that will be decided by voters this fall. . . .
 
10/23/2014 Instead of Returning Kidnapped Nigerian Schoolgirls Boko Haram Reportedly Abducted More Women and Girls - Despite Nigerian military officials announcement last week that they had negotiated with militant group Boko Haram for the release of more than 200 schoolgirls who were kidnapped in April, it appears the girls have not be brought home - and residents say more women and girls have been kidnapped since. Last week, in a deal brokered in neighboring country Chad, a ceasefire agreement was supposedly made between Boko Haram and Nigerian military officials. . . .
 
10/23/2014 Ferguson October Continues With National Day of Action Against Police Brutality and Mass Incarceration - Activists organized actions nationwide yesterday to protest police brutality in cities across the country as part of ongoing Ferguson October events, while outrage grows in Missouri over the the grand jury proceeding on whether Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson should face criminal charges in the shooting death of unarmed African-American teenager Michael Brown. As part of the National Day of Protest to Stop Police Brutality and Mass Incarceration, on-the-ground organizers in Ferguson, Missouri and St. . . .