Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

August-30-02

Fort Bragg Killings Prompt Mental Health Screening for Returning Soldiers

After the killings of four women this summer in Fort Bragg, North Carolina allegedly by their enlisted husbands, three of whom had recently returned from Afghanistan, the US military announced yesterday it will screen soldiers heading home for signs of mental health problems. Investigators are also looking into the possible side effects of Larium, a common drug prescribed to soldiers to protect against malaria. While its manufacturer, Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. warns that side effects can include “neurological and psychiatric disorders,” the World Health Organization estimates that severe effects are only experienced by five out of 100,000.

Frank Ochberg, former associate director of the National Institute of Mental Health, told the Associated Press that studies have not shown a strong correlation between domestic violence and the post-traumatic stress disorder commonly experienced by soldiers returning from combat. Ochberg points out that “far more often domestic violence has to do with bullying, jealousy, desire to control a spouse.”

In the military, the rate of domestic violence incidents rose from 18.6 to 25.6 per 1,000 military personnel between 1990 and 1996. Since then, the rate has decreased to 16.5 per 1,000 in 2001, but still remains much higher than in the civilian population, which has 3.1 incidents of domestic violence per 1,000 people, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Though numbers are not available for the past 10 months, the downward trend may be reversing, according to Christine Hansen, executive director of the Miles Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides services to domestic abuse victims in the military community. “We have seen through our clients alone an increase in the number of domestic violence incidents since mid-October as well as an increase in the severity of abuse,” she told the Journal-Constitution.

Media Resources: Associated Press 8/30/02, 8/21/02; Atlanta Journal-Constitution 8/30/02


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

9/29/2014 Hope for Afghan Women as New President is Sworn In - Ashraf Ghani, who has has publicly and consistently stated his support for women's rights and women's participation in government, was sworn in as the new President of Afghanistan today at the Presidential Palace in Kabul. Over 1000 national and international guests attended the ceremony, including high-ranking officials from the United Nations and 34 countries, including a delegation from the United States. . . .
 
9/29/2014 Civil Rights Lawsuit for Transgender Workers Is First of its Kind - The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has brought two lawsuits on behalf of transgender workers. . . .
 
9/29/2014 Advocates and Legislators Say NFL Corrections Go Wide But Not Deep Enough - Women's rights activists and anti-violence advocates are continuing to put pressure on the National Football League (NFL), calling for a more inclusive and robust institutional response to domestic violence and sexual assault as well as an independent investigation into the League. This summer, NFL executive leadership came under fire after the League failed to take action when video evidence of Ravens' running back Ray Rice punching his then-fiancee surfaced. . . .