Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

June-04-02

Honduran Women Trafficked in Texas

Forty Honduran women and girls, lured by the promise of jobs as maids and waitresses, trekked for days from Choluteca, Honduras to Fort Worth, Texas only to be tricked and forced into a Texas couple’s sex trafficking ring. In testimony delivered last Friday, Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) Special Agent George Ramirez described the sex trafficking operation run by Antonio Molina, 32, and Guadalupe Molina, 27, as an extensive network beginning with relatives recruiting Choluteca women aged 19 to 23 years old and girls aged 14 to 16 years old, followed by the transport and subsequent housing of victims under constant surveillance in Fort Worth homes and apartments maintained by the Molinas. According to Ramirez, one woman was repeatedly raped during the journey and immediately following arrival, all of the victims were forced to work at bars, promoting beer sales and providing prostitution services.

The May 16 raid of the “Molina organization” resulted in 88 arrests. US Magistrate Judge Charles Bleil charged the couple with conspiracy to harbor undocumented immigrants, and the couple was jailed without bail. As one local Honduran following the story commented, “It’s horrible. People are looking for the American dream to build a better life, but nobody knows the risk along the way.”

According to officials at the Second World Congress Against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children held in December 2001, sex trafficking is the third most lucrative criminal activity in the world after smuggling arms and narcotics. According to the 2000 Annual Trafficking in Persons Report issued by the US State Department, between 45,000 and 50,000 people—mostly women and children—are trafficked to the United States and forced to work in sweatshop like conditions or in the sex industries as prostitutes. The United Nations, however, estimates that between 244,000 and 325,000 women and children are victims of commercial sexual exploitation in the United States.

Media Resources: Fort Worth Star-Telegram 5/31/02; Feminist Majority Foundation 5/29/02


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

9/12/2014 Violence Against Women Act Turns 20 - Saturday will be the 20th Anniversary of the groundbreaking federal Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Passed in 1994, VAWA was the first piece of federal legislation to specifically address domestic violence and sexual assault as crimes and to provide federal funding to improve local response to violence against women, including training and resources for law enforcement and judges. President Barack Obama on Tuesday issued a proclamation commemorating the VAWA anniversary. . . .
 
9/12/2014 Indiana Woman Charged With Feticide For Premature Delivery - An Indiana woman has been charged with feticide after she delivered prematurely and sought hospital treatment. Purvi Patel, 33, sought help at an emergency room for vaginal bleeding where it was discovered that she had delivered prematurely at home. . . .
 
9/11/2014 Missouri Legislators Pass 72-Hour Abortion Waiting Period Law - Missouri legislators voted late last night to triple the state's current 24-hour waiting period to 72 hours, with no exceptions for rape or incest. Governor Jay Nixon previously vetoed the bill in July, calling it "extreme and disrespectful." Missouri's House voted 117-44 to override the veto, and then the Senate used a procedural move to stop a Democratic filibuster of the bill and vote 23-7 to complete the veto override Wednesday. "The only purpose of a 72-hour waiting period is to attempt to punish, shame, and demean women who have arrived at a personal decision that politicians happen to disagree with," said the president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights in a statement. . . .