Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

May-29-02

Washington Post Urges Increased Effort to Combat Sex Slavery

In an editorial appearing in today’s Washington Post, the newspaper called on the US to withhold aid from countries that are not working vigorously enough to curb sex trafficking and sex slavery. The Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 establishes global standards for the elimination of sex trafficking and allows the US government to apply pressure to countries found in violation of those standards. Among the biggest offenders, according to the Washington Post, are India, Thailand, and Cambodia. The State Department notes that more than 2.3 million women and girls are forced prostitutes in India. In Thailand, child sex slaves number close to 1 million, and in Cambodia, and estimated 20,000 child sex slaves work out of brothels. The Washington Post reports, however, that these countries were not included on a list developed by the State Department in 2001 of nations found to be too “complacent” about prosecuting and convicting sex traffickers. “There is an internal debate about which countries will be fingered; country specialists within the department, concerned about causing offense that might damage other US interests, tend to want leniency,” explained the Post. “But naming and shaming offending countries is a good way to stimulate the prosecutorial crackdowns that could actually curb sex slavery.” The State Department is now preparing to publish its 2002 list.

Sex trafficking is the third most lucrative criminal activity in the world after smuggling arms and narcotics according to officials present at the Second World Congress Against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children held in December 2001. The United States, itself, is not immune to sex trafficking. According to the 2000 Annual Trafficking in Persons Report issued by the State Department, between 45,000 and 50,000 people - mostly women and children - are trafficked to the United States and forced to work in sweatshop like conditions or in the sex industries as prostitutes. The United Nations, however, estimates that between 244,000 and 325,000 women and children are victims of commercial sexual exploitation in the United States.

Media Resources: Washington Post, 5/29/02


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

12/18/2014 New Jersey is Inching Closer to Mandatory Paid Sick Leave Statewide - The Assembly Budget Committee of the New Jersey state legislature approved a paid sick leave bill Monday by a 6-4 vote. If the bill is passed, New Jersey workers will earn one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked. . . .
 
12/18/2014 American Apparel Hired Its First-Ever Woman Chief Executive to Replace Dov Charney - Six months after retail store American Apparel fired its chief executive and founder Dov Charney, the company has hired retail executive Paula Schneider as a replacement. Schneider, who will become American Apparel's first female chief executive, will take over the position as of January 5. Charney had led American Apparel since 1998 and became well-known from American Apparel's sexist advertising and from several sexual harassment lawsuits and sexual assault accusations against him by former employees. . . .
 
12/18/2014 Obama's Judicial Appointments Most Diverse in History - Congress came to a close on Tuesday night with the Senate confirmation of 12 new federal judges and 12 executive appointments - including Vivek Murthy as Surgeon General, Sarah Saldana as head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and Tony Blinken as deputy Secretary of State. . . .