Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

August-31-00

Australia Treatment Of Aborigines And Refugee Seekers Criticized By U.N.; Australia Threatens To Revoke Any U.N. Involvement Including CEDAW Optional Protocol

Earlier this year the Australian government came under criticism by the United Nations (U.N.) because of discriminatory policies. The U.N. Human Rights Committee charged that the Australian mandatory sentencing laws specifically discriminated against Aborigines, its indigenous population. In another close examination of Australia's policies since the termination of the "white Australia policy" that only European descent immigrants be admitted, the U.N. criticized Australia's policy of holding refugee and asylum seekers in detention camps while their refugee applications are reviewed. According to the Refugee Council of Australia, "(Australia) is the only country that detains all people that arrive without documentation, whether they are a risk to the community or not."

The brewing controversy over Australia's refugee policies draws a heightened level of concern for the growing number of Afghan refugee and asylum seekers there. Since 1999, more than 3,700 persons primarily fleeing Afghanistan, China and Iraq sought asylum in Australia. The Australian Department of Immigration reports that between January and July 11, 2000, approximately 1,345 asylum seekers arrived in the country, most of whom were Afghans and Iraqis.

During the U.N. Millennium Summit held in New York this week, Australia announced that it will not ratify the optional protocol of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and asked that the treaty be removed from U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan's list of international covenants to be signed. On August 28, 2000, Australia announced that it would "veto nearly all visits by U.N. human rights investigators in response to criticisms of (its) treatment of Aborigines and asylum-seekers."

Media Resources: The Age (http://www.theage.com) 31 August 2000, The Christian Science Monitor (http://www.csmonitor.com) 31 August 2000, Associated Press (http://wire.ap.org) 29 August 2000.


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

9/2/2015 Judge Rules Employers Can Object to Contraceptive Coverage on Moral Grounds - A district court judge ruled in favor of anti-choice group March for Life Monday, deciding that employers don't have to meet the contraceptive mandate of the Affordable Care Act if they have moral objections to birth control. . . .
 
9/1/2015 Nation's "Strongest Equal Pay Law" Set to Pass in California - California Governor Jerry Brown (D) is set to sign what has been called "the strongest equal pay law in the nation." The Fair Pay Act, introduced by Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-CA),passed unanimously in both the State Assembly and Senate earlier this summer. . . .
 
9/1/2015 Claims Against Planned Parenthood Repeatedly Proven Bogus - Five states have now concluded investigations into the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA), and every single investigation has concluded no wrongdoing. . . .