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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

July-11-00

The Technological Revolution Leaves Women in Africa Behind

Women in Africa and developing nations are being left behind in the technological revolution, threatening to exacerbate gender inequities and further push women and girls into impoverishment. Women remain economically marginalized due to the global feminization of poverty. For instance, in the sub-Saharan economies, women perform up to 80 percent of the agricultural work, but earn only 20 percent or less of the revenue. At the United Nations Beijing +5 Conference in New York, delegates criticized the obstacles that women faced in gaining access to the Internet and other technology. "In developing countries for instance, almost all computers and telephones are owned by men. Women therefore have very little access to the Internet," said Sarah Murison of the UN Development Programme on Gender.

Media Resources: Africa News, 4 July 2000


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