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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

June-27-97

House Subcommittee Discusses GOP Bill Prohibiting Affirmative Action

On Thursday, June 26, the House Judiciary subcommittee on the Constitution concluded that the country needs affirmative action because the "preferences have been on the side of white America for so long." Members of the subcommittee who supported the deceptively-titled “Civil Rights Act of 1997” often claimed that the passage of Proposition 209, a California measure which bans affirmative action serves as "proof" that the entire country opposes affirmative action. Effects of Prop 209 are already showing in California's law schools. University of California-Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law will have only one black student enrolling in the class that begins in August. According to Richard Russell, a member of the UC Board of Regents, "It's obvious that the resegregation of higher education has begun."

Media Resources: USA Today and The Los Angeles Times - June 27, 1997


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