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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

August-15-97

U.S. Suspends Operation of Afghan Embassy

The United States has decided to suspend operations indefinitely at the Afghan Embassy. State Department spokesperson James P. Rubin said the action was taken because "of the U.S. belief that there is no effective government in Afghanistan, which is divided between two warring factions." The embassy is occupied by two diplomats from each government, however the embassy is effectively operated by the Taliban, the Afghan militia that has repeatedly violated women's rights in the past months. The suspension, according to Rubin, reflects the decision by the United States to remain strictly neutral in Afghan affairs.

Media Resources: The Washington Post - August 15, 1997


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