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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

September-12-95

U.S. Women Still Face Discrimination

In a poll of three-thousand women, eighty-four percent stated that they still face more restrictions than men. Seventy-seven percent of the women stated that they still face sexual discrimination. The women went on to say that the discrimination was less open, but nonetheless a serious problem. Seventy-six percent also claimed that sexual harassment existed in the workplace. Roper Starch Worldwide Inc., who conducts the poll every five years for Virginia Slims, found that a still prevalent old boys ' network and lack of role models, among other factors, keep women from achieving full equality. Forty percent of the one-thousand men polled stated that they received great satisfaction from their work life -- up from thirty-five percent in 1990. Only thirty-one percent of the women, however, claimed the same --down from thirty-seven percent in 1990.

Media Resources: New York Times News Service, September 12, 1995


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