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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

October-22-97

U. Penn Women's Athletics Short-Changed

In a report to the federal government, the University of Pennsylvania revealed that men's athletic programs receive more than twice the funds of women's athletics.

Although this is a violation of Title IX, which states that men's and women's athletic programs must receive virtually equal funding, the university said they were making progress. Title IX requires athletic departments to show that they are making consistent efforts each year to follow the law.

A 1995 law requires universities to publicize information about their athletic programs and file reports with the government and the NCAA. The report said total operating expenses for men's athletic teams was $925,717 in 1996-97, while women's teams received only $433,989 -- 32% of the money spent on athletics overall. Three-quarters of the total recruiting budget last year was used for men's athletics. The school is 51.5% male, but women make up 37% of the university's varsity athletes, even though they have almost as many varsity teams and full-time coaches as men. Men's part-time coaches outnumbered women's, a figure mostly explained by the presence of 16 assistant coaches for the football team.

Next semester, the university will survey female students to determine their "needs and interests" and what changes they want made to Penn's athletic programs.

Media Resources: Daily Pennsylvanian - October 21, 1997


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