Ms. magazine  -- more than a magazine a movement

SIGN UP FOR MS. DIGEST, JOBS, NEWS AND ALERTS

FEMINIST WIRE NEWSBRIEFS

ABOUT
SEE CURRENT ISSUE
SHOP MS. STORE
MS. IN THE CLASSROOM
FEMINIST DAILY WIRE
FEMINIST RESOURCES
PRESS
JOBS AT MS.
READ BACK ISSUES
CONTACT
RSS (XML)
 
feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

April-07-14

Millions of Afghans Vote in Historic Elections

High turnout, low levels of violence, and strong participation by women, all combined Saturday to make the closely watched Afghan presidential and provincial council elections a success.

Over 7 million Afghan men and women voted in these historic elections - representing a staggering 60% voter participation rate, close to the 62% participation rate in the US presidential election in 2008 and more than the 58% participation rate in the US in 2012. The Afghan Independent Commission (IEC) estimates that at least one-third of Afghan voters on Saturday were women.

Voters braved rain, snow, and long lines - as well as potential and real incidents of violence - in order to cast their ballots. Although the level of violence during this election was much lower than in 2009, news reports indicated several attacks on polling stations, police, and voters, and some voting centers had to close because of security concerns. In addition, the days leading up to the election saw other attacks, including the shooting of Associated Press journalists Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon. Niedringhaus was killed in the attack.

Despite the threat, however, the Taliban could not disrupt the election. In fact, turnout was so high - only about 4.5 million voted in the last election - that the IEC had to extend hours at voting centers to accommodate the crowds. "Of course the massive turnout of women voters is a big slap to all those who want to block us to contribute," said Samira Huria, a member of the Afghan Women's Network and one of the many women who voted in the election.

"The women of Afghanistan risked their lives to vote. They are real heroes," said Feminist Majority Foundation President Eleanor Smeal. "The road, however, is still long, and we must continue to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with Afghan women in their struggle for full equality and democracy."

Women have played a central role in the elections. Over 200 women candidates ran for provincial council seats, the largest number of women ever to run, and two women are running for vice president - one on a major candidate's ticket. In addition, each of the presidential candidates have had to address women's rights in their campaigns, a testament to the importance of women to the election and to the redevelopment of Afghanistan.

Election results are not expected until late-April. If no presidential candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the country will conduct a run-off election in May.

Media Resources: New York Times 4/6/14; CNN 4/5/14; The Guardian 4/5/14; Reuters 4/5/14; BBC News 4/4/14; Feminist Newswire 4/4/14


© Feminist Majority Foundation, publisher of Ms. magazine

If you liked this story, consider making a tax-deductible donation to support Ms. magazine.

 

 

Send to a Friend
Their
Your
Comments
(optional)


More Feminist News

11/25/2014 Feminist Majority Foundation President Eleanor Smeal Responds to Ferguson Grand Jury Decision - The following is the statement of Eleanor Smeal, the Founder and President of the Feminist Majority Foundation: "The Feminist Majority Foundation is outraged at the decision not to indict Darren Wilson. This should have been a public trial. . . .
 
11/25/2014 Marissa Alexander Has Accepted a Plea Deal - Marissa Alexander, the woman imprisoned for firing a warning shot in the presence of her abusive husband, chose to accept a plea deal Monday with the state of Florida, pleading guilty to three felony counts of aggravated assault. As part of the plea deal, Alexander received three years imprisonment, but she will be credited for the time she's spent behind bars. . . .
 
11/24/2014 The City of Louisville Has Overwhelmingly Approved a CEDAW Resolution - The city of Louisville, Kentucky approved a resolution that will use the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) as a framework for all future policy aimed at ending gender-based discrimination. Councilwoman Tina Ward-Pugh introduced the resolution, which passed overwhelmingly on November 6. . . .