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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

October-16-13

North Carolina Welfare Program Suspended Due to Shutdown

North Carolina has suspended its welfare program, called Work First, because of the government shutdown. The program is funded through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

On Monday, social service agencies in North Carolina stopped processing all new applications for Work First because funds are expected to run out in November. Those who are already registered will still receive assistance through October.

Until the government shutdown ends, future assistance is up in the air for the 20,709 state residents in the program, 6,948 of whom are parents of dependent children and 13,761 of whom are children living with someone other than a parent.

North Carolina is the first state to suspend its welfare program. No state has received federal funding under TANF since October 1.

Media Resources: ThinkProgress 10/15/13; North Carolina Division of Social Services; News Observer 10/14/13


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