Ms. Magazine
The F Word
The word "feminist" still raises hackles. Is claiming this word all about age, race, and class?

MS.CELLANEOUS:
-What?
-Just The Facts
-Word: Impossible
-Women to Watch

Zero Balance
Those entering middle age are discovering--sometimes too late--that women get the short end of the stick when it comes to retirement benefits.
YOUR HEALTH:
-Healthnotes
-Women's Bodies are Finally Being Studied
The Abortion Pill
Making mifepristone available in this country took decades of struggle and remains fraught with controversy.
-Editor's Page
-Letters
-The Guerilla Girls
-No Comment
-Poetry
-News
Portfolio: Romaine Brooks
Lesbian society in Paris at the turn of the 20th century is captured by this groundbreaking portraitist.
Uppity Women: Rosario Robles' Bold Agenda

Books:
-The Serpent Slayer by Katrin Tchana, Illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman
-Desirada, Maryse Conde
-Glory Goes And Gets Some, Emily Carter
-The Moon Pearl, Ruthanne Lum McCunn
-Kiss My Tiara, Susan Jane Gilman
-Motiba's Tattoos, Mira Kamdar

-First Person: By Any Other Name
-Columns: Daisy Hernandez, Patricia Smith and Gloria Steinem
 
BY SHERI WHITLEY
The question of whether to tell children they are adopted was solved decades ago: honesty is the best policy. But welcome to the world of genetic engineering, where parents who conceived their children using donor eggs, surrogate mothers, and the like are wondering what to do. A new guide by the American Infertility Association says telling the truth is still the best approach. Available at www.americaninfertility.org, the guide also offers valuable tips on how to have age-appropriate discussions with kids.
 
When asked what they most wanted from elected officials, nine out of ten women in a recent survey named health care issues as the major priority. The top issues they were concerned about? Medicare, direct access to Ob-Gyns without HMO referrals, and funding for research on women's health. Almost two thirds of the women say officials have barely addressed these issues.
 
Having a medical history made public is a problem for anyone, but it can be a real danger for battered women: a shelter address can be inadvertently given to an abuser, or an insurer may refuse coverage after reviewing a woman's record of hospital visits. The Department of Health and Human Services is considering new medical privacy regulations and the Family Violence Prevention Fund has asked the department to include procedures for handling the records of battered women. If you support including such procedures, contact FVPF at (415) 252-8900 or www.fvpf.org to find out what to do.
 
Your chances of delivering your baby vaginally are higher if you use a female doctor. According to a Yale University study, male physicians are nearly 40% more likely to perform cesareans than female doctors. No one knows exactly why, but researchers think women doctors better understand the female body and do a better job of communicating with their patients.
 
That's how some women describe men's listening abilities, and a new study--with all of 40 people--backs them up. The media's been having a field day with the findings that men "listen" with only the left side of their brains, while women use both sides. Depending on who's reporting, you may learn that men are smarter because they only use half as much brain power, or that women outshine men because they listen more fully. They're all wrong. Researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine, who did the study, say there's no evidence that one sex listens better than the other.