Twentieth Century Foxes Twelve centenarians reflect on women' progress an offer advice.
Time Capsule Capturing the century through the objects that changed women's lives
Women on The Verge of 2000

Ms.CELLANEOUS
-Just the Facts
-Word: (My) Lord
-Weightlifter
-Have You Seen This Potato?

What About Tomorrow?>by Marcia Ann Gillespie
YOUR WORK:
-Go Figure: Wag Gap Wrangling
-Why the Consulting Business Is Becoming Woman Friendly
-Women Architects: If You Build It
-Worknotes
Who Knew? A compendium of women's deeds, feats, and innovations
ARTS:
-Great Leaps Forward -Artswatch
Being There A look back at the events that shaped and changed America during the twentieth century
BOOKS:
-Novel Companions: Writers on Books They Treasure

- Editor's Page
- Letters
- Making Waves
- No Comment

NEWS
- Activists: The Bottom Line for '99
-Liberte, Egalite, Parite
-NOW Does Hollywood
-Opinion: Abortion and Crime
-Women on the Verge of 2000
-Mexico City's Women Traffic Cops
-Opinion: Guns and Lobsters
-Indian Women Sue Canadian Feds
- Under Fire: The Year of the Gun
 
 
BY MOIRA BRENNAN
Hasta Manana Studies show that Mexican men are the least likely among their Latin American compatriots to bag the trash, scrape the dinner plates, or do the laundry. Now the Mexico City government has created a Program for Equal Participation of Women, which got off to a fierce start by calling a homemakers' strike this past July 22. It urged women to drop the mop and attend government-sponsored forums, concerts, and plays instead. Although the turnout was small (about a hundred women rallied at the events), organizers are determined; next year there'll be both a strike and a march. Program director Gabriela Delgado Ballesteros says one of the strike's biggest successes was making housework an issue in the media.

Survey Says Approximately 61 million women in the U.S. work for pay. We are decidedly a voting block, so let candidates know what you need through the AFL-CIO's Ask a Working Woman survey. By gathering the concerns of women into one collective statement, the study--to be distributed during primary season--will send a message to state and federal candidates that attention must be paid. To request a questionnaire or for info on the AFL-CIO's Working Women Conference 2000, to be held in Chicago in March, call (888) 971-9797 or check out www.aflcio.org/women.

 
What Benefits Do Women Want Most?
BENEFIT
% women who believe it's very important
% women who currently have it on their job
Equal pay for equal work
94
62
A safe and healthy workplace
93
89
Secure, affordable health insurance
87
68
Paid sick leave
82
68
Pension and retirement benefits
79
65
Punishment for sexual harassment
78
65
Protection from layoffs and downsizing
72
34
Paid leave to care for family members who are sick
70
52
Flexible hours or control over work hours
61
61
Child care
33
8
Elder care
25
8
Source: Lake Sosin Snell Perry and Associates for AFL-CIO, 1997
 
Doctor Discontent In a nationwide survey of 4,501 female physicians, the good news is that 84% are generally satisfied with their careers. The bad news? One in three would probably opt for a different career if they could do it all over again. The findings of the Women Physicians' Health Study reveal that the biggest complaints are not enough control over the work, too much stress, and severe on-the-job harassment. Discontent is highest among younger M.D.s.
 
Pregnant Pause Ever wonder what effect pregnancy leave has on your pension? A growing number of lawsuits are being brought against businesses that withhold pension credits for pregnancy-related time off. A precedent was set recently when California's Pacific Bell agreed to an estimated $25 million payout on pension claims to settle a suit. The case was initiated by Lana Pallas, who, when she applied for early retirement, was told she hadn't worked long enough: she was short by four days due to leave she had taken when her daughter was born. PacBell employees who took disability leave for other reasons weren't docked. If you think you're the victim of pregnancy discrimination, contact NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund at 395 Hudson St., N.Y., N.Y., 10014 or call (212) 925-6635.
 
 
           
     

Copyright Ms. Magazine 2009