Ms. Magazine

Winter 2003
* * * * *
Contents

News
National
Silicone's Back
Implant Loans
Single Mom's Struggle
Where's the Poverty Line?
Massachusetts Women Take City Hall by the Grassroots
YWCA Ousts Patricia Ireland

Global
Fighting Fistula
Women and Kids Lose Most in War
Rape as Weapon in DRC
State Dept. Vet Quits Over Iraq
Britain's Tories Turn Feminist?
First Woman on U.K. High Court
Honduran Injustice

MS. WOMEN OF THE YEAR
Eileen Fisher
Loune Viaud
Salma Hayek
Martha Burk
Sima Samar
Pamela Thomas-Graham
Jessica Neuwirth
Joan Blades
Carla Diane Hayden
Niki Caro

Features
Cheers & Cringes: The Year in Review
50 Women Who Made a Difference
Sojourner Truth: Part 2
Dearest Carolyn

Departments

Touching History

Passings

Poetry
Salt by Cleopatra Mathis
Indoors by Vona Groarke

Book Reviews
Madras on Rainy Days by Samina Ali
We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity by bell hooks
Serious Girls by Maxine Swann
The Little Women by Katharine Weber
Flesh Wounds: The Culture of Cosmetic Surgery by Virginia Blum

Send a Letter to the Editor
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FromTheIssue

50 Women Who Made a Difference

by Mary Bridges, Alizah Salanio, Camille Hahn, Michel Cicero, Kari Browne, Sarah Gonzales, Michele Kort

Movers and shakers, teens and grandmas, chess champ and golf pro, surgeon and artist, soldier and hugger -- these women, and more, changed our lives in the past year.

Catherine Hamlin, M.D., Surgeon and anti-fistula activist, Ethiopia
Jennifer Shahade, Chess champion, New York
Gwen Ifill
, Journalist, Washington, DC
Drew Dakessian, Teen feminist activist, Oregon

return for more later...

Catherine Hamlin, M.D
Surgeon and anti-fistula activist, Ethiopia


Photo by Shaleece Haas

At 79, Hamlin is still the world’s foremost surgeon repairing fistulas, the preventable pregnancy complication that often goes untreated in women in poor countries. The
Sydney-born doctor, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, moved to Ethiopia with her husband in 1959, and together they founded the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in 1974. It since has treated more than 22,000 women and is the leading teaching hospital for surgeons in the developing world. Among her many honors, Dr. Hamlin was inducted this year as an honorary fellow in the American College of Surgeons.

Catherine Hamlin, M.D
Surgeon and anti-fistula activist, Ethiopia


Photo by Shaleece Haas

At 79, Hamlin is still the world’s foremost surgeon repairing fistulas, the preventable pregnancy complication that often goes untreated in women in poor countries. The
Sydney-born doctor, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, moved to Ethiopia with her husband in 1959, and together they founded the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in 1974. It since has treated more than 22,000 women and is the leading teaching hospital for surgeons in the developing world. Among her many honors, Dr. Hamlin was inducted this year as an honorary fellow in the American College of Surgeons.

Catherine Hamlin, M.D
Surgeon and anti-fistula activist, Ethiopia


Photo by Shaleece Haas

At 79, Hamlin is still the world’s foremost surgeon repairing fistulas, the preventable pregnancy complication that often goes untreated in women in poor countries. The
Sydney-born doctor, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, moved to Ethiopia with her husband in 1959, and together they founded the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in 1974. It since has treated more than 22,000 women and is the leading teaching hospital for surgeons in the developing world. Among her many honors, Dr. Hamlin was inducted this year as an honorary fellow in the American College of Surgeons.

Catherine Hamlin, M.D
Surgeon and anti-fistula activist, Ethiopia


Photo by Shaleece Haas

At 79, Hamlin is still the world’s foremost surgeon repairing fistulas, the preventable pregnancy complication that often goes untreated in women in poor countries. The
Sydney-born doctor, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, moved to Ethiopia with her husband in 1959, and together they founded the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in 1974. It since has treated more than 22,000 women and is the leading teaching hospital for surgeons in the developing world. Among her many honors, Dr. Hamlin was inducted this year as an honorary fellow in the American College of Surgeons.

Catherine Hamlin, M.D
Surgeon and anti-fistula activist, Ethiopia


Photo by Shaleece Haas

At 79, Hamlin is still the world’s foremost surgeon repairing fistulas, the preventable pregnancy complication that often goes untreated in women in poor countries. The
Sydney-born doctor, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, moved to Ethiopia with her husband in 1959, and together they founded the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in 1974. It since has treated more than 22,000 women and is the leading teaching hospital for surgeons in the developing world. Among her many honors, Dr. Hamlin was inducted this year as an honorary fellow in the American College of Surgeons.

Jennifer Shahade
Chess champion, New York


50
Women
Who Made a
Difference

In the offices of New York City’s Chess-in-the-Schools, 23-year-old chess master Jennifer Shahade conducts a “Girls Academy,” instructing her students, ages 9 to 13, to “play like girls”—meaning they should emulate important women players and learn their moves. The strongest American-born female player ever—only one of the top 100 players in the world is a woman—Shahade is encouraging female chess players both with her teaching and with the book she’s writing on women in chess. “The game is finally shedding its image as a magnet for geeks,” says Shahade.

Gwen Ifill
Journalist, Washington, D.C.


Photo by Chad Evans Wyatt

Possessing one of the most recognizable faces on PBS, Ifill provides a voice, commentary and journalistic professionalism that are a refreshing alternative to media conglomerate newspeak. A correspondent and moderator on “The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer” and the host of “Washington Week,” she earlier this year co-hosted “Flashpoints USA” with Bryant Gumbel. Ifill, 48, avoids sensationalistic reporting and rating chases; she’s one of the most respected journalists in both the print and broadcast worlds, delivering news and analysis with dignity in an industry still employing few powerful women.

Drew Dakessian
Teen feminist activist, Oregon

Photo by Alan Dakessian

At the precocious age of 14, this Portland, Ore., teen is already a crusading feminist. This year she started “GirlCaught,” a grassroots effort to identify advertisements targeted at young women that are harmful to their self-esteem and body image. Girls are then urged to boycott products hyped with such demeaning portrayals. Based on her inner beauty, Dakessian was chosen this year by New Moon: The Magazine for Girls and Their Dreams as one of their “25 Beautiful Girls”; she represented all 25 as a guest on ABC-TV’s “The View.”
Copyright Ms. Magazine 2009